23 Apr 2008

April 23, St George's Day

Time to make a respectful bow to the daddy of English naturalists, Gilbert White who recorded his observations in The Natural History of Selborne, the inspiration for this blog. Here are the St George's Day entries from his journals:

• 1793: April 23, 1793 – Mowed the terrace. Cut the first cucumber. Pulled the first radishes. A swallow over my meadow.
• 1792: April 23, 1792 – A nest of young blackbirds destroyed by a cat in my garden.
• 1789: April 23, 1789 – Swallows & martins do not yet frequent houses. Women hoe wheat.
• 1788: April 23, 1788 – Gave away 24 eggs of my Bantham kind among my neighbours.
• 1787: April 23, 1787 – Cuckow sings on the hill. Nightingale sings in my outlet.
• 1786: April 23, 1786 – Grass lamb. Timothy, if you offer him some poppy leaves, will eat a little; but does not seek for food.
• 1784: April 23, 1784 – Timothy the tortoise comes forth from his winter-retreat.
• 1783: April 23, 1783 – No hirudines.
• 1779: April 23, 1779 – The caterpillars of some phalaenae attack the foliage of the apricots again.
• 1775: April 23, 1775 – Swallows abound; but no house-martin, or black-cap. No swift.

Now bookmark the site A Natural History of Selborne and visit regularly.

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